Sex and junk food

What if every time you indulged in a high calorie dessert like ice cream or cake you had an orgasm? Would it change the way you live? Would it change the way you conducted your life?

A Colorado woman discovered she had such a condition.

Gabi Jones, 25, who has a rare ­condition called persistent genital arousal ­disorder, gorges on high-calorie treats like ice cream and cakes until she has a climax.

The 48DDD blonde experienced her first food orgasm in her late teens at an ice cream parlor called Wickedy Splits.

She said: “I loved the velvety texture of ice cream on my tongue. Then one day as I was tucking in I felt a tingle starting down below.”

“The pressure kept building until ­suddenly it swept through my body. I felt light-headed and flushed.”

“I was stunned, but in no doubt of what had happened.”

“My friends thought I was making it up. But from then on, every time I tucked into rich, creamy desserts the trembling and tingling began.”

“I went out and bought an ice-cream maker and soon I had knee-trembling ­orgasms whenever I wanted.”

Gabi, from Denver, Colorado, tipped the scales at 275 pounds in her ­early 20s, then ballooned by 210 pounds over the last five years.

Now as strange as that is, I want to point out the prevailing cultural attitude to sex as a recreational activity to be partaken in without any fear of consequences (biological, physiological, psychological, etc.) is not much different.

It seems to me that our culture is preoccupied with promoting junk food sex. In this view, sex is nothing more than another biological activity like eating food, but unlike eating food the prevailing notion is that sex should be indulged in wherever, with whomever, and for whatever reason.

Take the “I have sex” campaign promoted by Planned Parenthood in order to preserve their federal funding:

Sex is no big deal. Everyone does it. Its fun. And because we’ve been told it is an absolute right to partake of it without any context or fear of consequences, it is seen as a basic human right that others should uphold by allowing us to remove any and all barriers to our self-satisfaction.

What’s the difference between what Planned Parenthood tells kids about sex and Gabi’s view on eating?

Gabi, who loves hiking and swimming, added: “It really annoys me when people say: ‘You’re so unhealthy and fat.’

“I don’t drink, I don’t smoke, I’ve never done drugs. I am fat, fit and healthy.

“I won’t stop what I do until the world recognizes that fat is fabulous.”

In both cases, the key is to get rid of or attempt to downplay the obvious biological consequences. And while, thanks to modern technology, they are able to mask the problems their behaviors and beliefs entail.

Gabi can be morbidly obese, the children of Planned Parenthood can continue having random sex with random people (“safely” of course).

And since we don’t want to acknowledge pesky realities like biology, it is necessary that we stand with groups like the GLBT movement who also want to create a reality all their own in order to indulge in self gratification.

Finally, to make it easier for everyone to do what they want, to gratify themselves in any way they please, we need to overturn any laws or social constructs (like marriage) which have the potential to harsh our fun.

This attitude is why fundamentalists are portrayed they way they are. Its not that their ideas are wrong or not well through out or ill-articulated. That’s really of little consequence.

Its all about having junk food sex.

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3 responses to “Sex and junk food

  1. They need another video with these signs:

    "I have STDs"

    "54% of people getting abortions were on birth control" (Per Guttmacher, Planned Parenthood's researcher)

  2. I have an idea for my own sign for me to carry!

    "I probably enjoy my roadster even more than you enjoy sex. I don't make you pay for my gas bill, so please don't make me pay for your contraceptives, abortions, and diseases."

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